Lyric Suite : Work information

Composers
Edvard (Hagerup) Grieg ( Music, Images,)
Performed by
Leonard Bernstein (Recording Artist), New York Philharmonic (Recording Artist), New York Philharmonic (Orchestra), Leonard Bernstein (Conductor), John Mcclure (Producer), Anton Seidl (1850-1898) (Orchestrations), Richard Killough (Producer)

This work

Work name
Lyric Suite
Work number
Op. 54
Key
n/a
Genre
A
Composed
1904-00-00 02:00:00

This recording

Label
SONY CLASSICAL
Producer
n/a
Engineer
n/a
Recording date
n/a

The Composers

Edvard (Hagerup) Grieg

Edvard Grieg was born in Bergen, Norway. His mother Gesine was a fine piano teacher and taught her son from an early age. In the summer of 1858, the violin virtuoso Ole Bull came to visit Grieg’s parents. The young Edvard had to play for the world-famous violinist, who convinced his parents to send him to the Leipzig Conservatory, where he studied composition and piano. Whilst there, he contracted pleurisy, a kind of tuberculosis, which marked him for the rest of his life. His left lung collapsed, which made his back bend, and greatly reduced his lung capacity. Nevertheless he graduated from the conservatory with excellent marks in 1862. Bull remained a friend of and source of inspiration to Grieg until the violinist died in 1880.

After a period at home in Norway Grieg moved to Copenhagen and it was there that he met the young composer Rikard Nordraak, an enthusiastic champion of Norwegian music and a decisive influence on him. Whilst in Denmark, Grieg once again met his cousin Nina Hagerup. They had grown up together in Bergen, but Nina moved with her family to Copenhagen when she was eight. Nina was an excellent pianist, but it was her beautiful voice that fascinated Grieg. They were secretly engaged in 1864, and married on the 11th June 1867. None of their parents attended the wedding.

The Griegs moved from Copenhagen to Kristiania (Oslo) and lived off the income from Edvard’s work as a conductor and piano teacher. Their daughter Alexandra was born on the 10th April 1868. The same year, Grieg composed the Piano Concerto in A minor.

On the 21st May 1869 their daughter Alexandra died from meningitis, and in 1875 Grieg’s parents died. In addition to this, Grieg felt that he had stagnated artistically. The situation reached a critical point in 1883 when Edvard left Nina. The intervening force that rescued their marriage was Grieg’s friend Frants Beyer. He persuaded Grieg to reconcile with Nina, and they moved to Troldhaugen in order to start afresh.

Grieg's own performances of Norwegian music, often with his wife, established him as a leading figure in the music of his own country. This brought subsequent collaboration in the theatre with the poets Bjornson and with Ibsen. In 1888 and in 1893 Grieg published respectively the Peer Gynt Suites I and II, which contain the most popular melodies from the incidental music to Ibsen’s play.

Grieg continued to divide his time between composition and activity in the concert-hall. He toured extensively in Europe until his poor health caught up with him and he died, in 1907, of chronic exhaustion. He was the most important Norwegian composer of the later 19th century, a period of growing national consciousness.

- MIDI FILE - from "Lyric Pieces": Arietta (1'13'')

Track listing

  • Norwegian Dance, Op. 35, No. 2 2:34 min
  • March of the Trolls (No. 4 from Lyric Suite, Op. 54) 3:30 min
  • Valse Triste, Op. 44 5:06 min
  • The Swan of Tuonela, Op. 22, No. 3 (Legend) 9:54 min
  • Finlandia, Op. 26 (Tone Poem) 7:41 min

Notes

Composed between 1867 and 1901, the ten books of Lyric Pieces cover the entire spectrum of Grieg's development as a composer for the piano. Within the confines of the piano miniature, Grieg creates a wide variety of character pieces, often with a strong folk-song influence.

In the 1890s Grieg returned to the Norwegian folk idioms he'd explored in earlier life, and book V of the Lyric Pieces, written in 1891, demonstrates this in the characterful Herdboy and Bell-ringing. In 1904 the composer orchestrated four of the pieces to create the Lyric Suite; the distinctive March of the Trolls has become particularly popular as a result.