Symphony No. 6 : Work information

Composers
Ludwig van Beethoven ( Music, Images,)
Performed by
Orchestre National Bordeaux Aquitaine, Alain Lombard (Conductor)

This work

Work name
Symphony No. 6
Work number
Op. 68
Key
F
Genre
A
Composed
1808-01-01 02:00:00

This recording

Label
Forlane CI
Producer
Ivan Pastor
Engineer
Jean-Marc Laisne
Recording date
1991-01-01 00:00:00

The Composers

Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven is regarded as one of the greatest composers in the history of Western music, and certainly the most dominant of the 19th century. In taking the Viennese Classicism of Mozart and Haydn to its limits and developing his own intensely personal style, his output heralds the birth of musical romanticism.

Although Beethoven's personal life was often turbulent, he managed to produce some of the most sublime music ever written. Among his most profound works can be counted the nine symphonies, the Missa Solemnis, many of the piano sonatas, the late string quartets, the Piano Concerto No. 5, and his only opera, Fidelio. All enjoy a permanent and important place in the musical canon.

Born in 1770, the son of an obscure musician in the provincial town of Bonn, Beethoven received his early musical training from his father and other local musicians. His talents for composition and the piano were quickly recognised and nurtured by court organist, Christian Gottlob Neefe, for whom the young Beethoven deputised.

Sent to Vienna in 1792 to study with Haydn, Beethoven spent the next decade establishing an enviable reputation as a virtuoso pianist and composer. He published an increasing number of works and enjoyed the patronage of Prince Lichnowsky and the Esterházys among others.

His gradual loss of hearing, though, threatened the course of his career. Realising that his condition was both incurable and permanent, Beethoven shunned social occasions to avoid revealing his potentially damaging secret. By 1818 he was virtually deaf and had to use conversation books to communicate.

Upon learning of his deafness, Beethoven suffered a period of fluctuating moods, powerfully voicing his despair in an 1802 letter to his brothers, the 'Heiligenstadt testament'. Managing to pull himself out of his malaise, Beethoven threw himself into the work that was now spreading his fame all over Europe.  

With financial stability finally achieved through the patronage of Beethoven's supporters, Archduke Rudolph, Prince Lobkowitz and Prince Kinsky, Beethoven's professional life reached a peak. His personal life, in contrast, was still in turmoil.

In 1812 he wrote a passionate love-letter to an unknown 'immortal beloved', now thought to be Antoine Brentano, a married and, hence, unavailable woman. This was the culmination of a series of unrequited or doomed love affairs and marked a turning point in the composer's life.

From this point on, Beethoven seems to have accepted the impossibility of marriage and, after a long period of diminished creativity, decided to dedicate his energies to composition. His recovery began in 1817 with the Hammerklavier sonata and continued with the Missa Solemnis, but further conflict with his sister-in-law over custody of his nephew, Karl, kept his personal life turbulent.

After the monumental Ninth Symphony of 1823-4, Beethoven dedicated his last years to the string quartet, though illness began to increasingly disrupt his compositional activities. Beethoven's relationship with his nephew also deteriorated and Karl's attempted suicide in August 1826 shattered the ailing composer. In late 1826 he developed jaundice and, after a lengthy illness, died on 26 March 1827; an estimated 10,000 people attended the funeral three days later.

Beethoven's influence, as both a composer and romantic artist, has proved enormous. His compelling private life and wonderful music ensured that his perceived 'heroic' struggle over personal obstacles became the idealised view of the composer in the romantic era. Similarly, there can be few composers born since that have escaped the shadow of his immense creativity and musicianship. He stands above virtually all others as one of  the most admired composers of all time.

Related Composers: Schubert, Mendelssohn, Weber

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.1: 1 Mov. (2'32'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.1: 2 Mov. (5'21'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.1: 3 Mov. (2'21'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.1: 4 Mov. (4'25'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.2: 1 Mov. (4'52'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.2: 2 Mov. (4'40'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.2: 3 Mov. (2'46'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.2: 4 Mov. (5'50'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.3: 1 Mov. (7'02'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.3: 2 Mov. (7'05'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.3: 3 Mov. (3'20'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata op.2 no.3: 4 Mov. (4'30'')

- MIDI FILE - from 5th Piano Concerto: Allegro (18'50'')

- MIDI FILE - from "Moonlight Sonata" op.27 n.2: 1th mov. (5'47'')

- MIDI FILE - Piano Sonata "Waldstein" (complete) (21'52'')

Track listing

  • Awakening of cheerful feelings on arrival in the country 9:08 min
  • Scene by the brook 10:40 min
  • Merry gathering of the countryfolk 5:45 min
  • Thunderstorm 3:54 min
  • Shepherd's song. Happy and grateful feelings after the storm 8:33 min

Notes

Written in the summer of 1808 while Beethoven was staying at Heiligenstadt, the Sixth Symphony is a world away from the Fifth, finished earlier in the year. Both masterpieces were first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December in a concert lasting over four hours.

The idea of a pastoral symphony was nothing new: Beethoven adapted the titles of his movments from an example by the eighteenth century composer Justin Heinrich Knecht called 'Le Portrait musical de la nature'. Beethoven's Symphony, however, is far more than musical painting; he expresses and evokes a deep love for the countryside.

Each movement contains wonderful music, from the joyful and sunny first movment to the rustic charm of the third. The Scene by the brook is the most obviously pictorial; Beethoven even quotes the call of the Quail, Nightingale and Cuckoo.

The linking of the last three movements into a single narrative is a clever device that works brilliantly. The terrifying Thunderstorm that so impressed Berlioz follows a peasant dance, and leads to a magisterial finale full of rejoicing. It concludes one of classical music's most popular works.